Wednesday, 6 June 2018

A Sacred Storm Blog Tour - The Epic New Sequel from Theodore Brun - The Wanderer Chronicles Continues

Becky Bookworm Book Review as part of A Sacred Storm Blog Tour





A Sacred Storm: An epic historical fantasy for fans of Bernard Cornwall and George RR Martin (The Wanderer Chronicles)A Sacred Storm: An epic historical fantasy for fans of Bernard Cornwall and George RR Martin by Theodore Brun

My rating: 5 of 5 stars

What can I say about a book where so much happens or worse yet doesn't happen (cue intrigue), with a seat-gripping, page-turning, heart-stopping cliff hanger within each chapter.
What can I say about a book that will keep you reading well past your usual bed time, a book that you won't be able to put down, a book that might even make you forget to eat...
What can I say about a book that weighs as much as the helmet on the cover. And just like a helmet completely absorbs you in the world it contains.
About a book that has more court intrigue, secret plots, hidden agendas and double-crossing than The Tudors and any Shakespearean Tragedy.
About a book that introduces old friends, new allies, and hidden enemies both near and far and some you don't see coming at all.
About a book that involves challenges, conflict, torture and war in both the mind, soul and body of our heroes.
About a book that weaves so eloquently old magic between the historical backdrop that it seems natural, captivating, alluring and still possess an air of danger, of the unknown.
About a book which will make you laugh out loud, gasp in shock, wince in empathetic pain and cry in sadness and relief and shout and cheer in triumph.
About a book that continues where it's series began, to shine light on a little known era of Viking/Scandinavian history and showing that sword wielding warriors can have JUST AS MUCH if not more adventure and bloodshed within their home realms, than those who went aboard across the seas.
About a book which has not only surpassed it's prequel but is a dazzling display of storytelling talent. Reaffirming Theodore as a bright new spark that shines as brightly as Bernard Cornwell, Giles Kristian or Justin Hill.
About a book that left me genuinely breathless, mind-blown and reeling from the truly epic climax of an ending and the lure of a new adventure to come in it's now greatly anticipated sequel...

What can I say about this book?
Four words really.
Buy It. Read it.
You really don't want to miss this off your bookshelf if you have read A Mighty Dawn - and if you haven't read that Order Both, Read Both. Simple.

View all my reviews

Wednesday, 11 April 2018

Becky Bookworm Book Review: Kin (Helga Finnsdottir 1) by Snorri Kristjansson

Kin (The Helga Finnsdottir #1)Kin by Snorri Kristjansson

My rating: 5 of 5 stars

This is an extremely well written murder mystery with echoes to Poirot and Sherlock but set within the Viking era.
For one who is not usually patient enough for crime mysteries I was instantly gripped.
The dynamic and variety of characters that make up this extended family reunion, both men, women and children, are so 3D, realistic and exhibit personalities that we may all recognise in ourselves and our own families.
Yet the tensions and drama are wrapped around a mystery not just who will be murdered but the cause of death but literal and motive, who did it and who knows... and with a fanastic cast of suspects and so many clues or misleading clues... it really does keep the reader and the inquisitive character of Helga, guessing until the final pages.
I am extremely impressed in how superbly enjoyable this Viking Noir was to read and I am delighted that there will be another one.

View all my reviews

Becky Bookworm Book Review: God's Hammer (Hakon's Saga 1) by Eric Schumaker

God's Hammer (Hakon's Saga, #1)God's Hammer by Eric Schumacher

My rating: 5 of 5 stars

In my historical readings of Vikings I had read albeit briefly about Hakon the Good but only in relation to Erik Bloodaxe coming to Northumbria and taking York.
Reading about Hakon gives this period a whole new angle. Not as much from the Saxons but from the impact Erik made to the feudal scandinavian realms before he came to Northumbria.
The author makes a valid point in his notes that Hakon is a rare type of scandinavian hero for a number of reasons that many people overlook or forget.
Firstly being a bastard son at the time he was the least likely son to ever claim the throne of early Norway.
Secondly being sent away to the court of Athelstan the first King of Engaland, it was doubted he would ever return to his homeland.
Thirdly the majority of his young life he was raised according to Saxon law and custom. He would have lost what little connection he had to the belief and ritual traditions of his pagan family and homeland.
Yet if Erik had not become known as the Kinslayer he would never have opened up a path or provided cause for the scandinavian people to summon Hakon to claim the throne.
However this happened when Hakon was quite young. When he had yet to test himself in battle.
So Hakon was sent back to an unfamiliar home, unfamiliar people and where his religion opposed their own.
Alliances would have been essential and critical for Hakon to form any kind of following in order to not only master an army against Erik but to also establish and prove himself worthy of being a King.
It is this great challenge but one of many that make Hakons rise to the throne so incredible it is almost unbelievable but it did happen. A Christian Norwegian Bastard Son somehow defeated his own brother and ruled a pagan country.
An amazing reversal of what Canute achieved when he finally won England back after his Fathers short reign only to convert to Christianity, marry the resident Norman Queen Emma and rule the Saxons for a peaceful 20+ years.
Hakon definitely seemed to have had the hardest population to manage compared to Canute.
It is definitely a historical figure that people should learn more about and so I do encourage and recommend this very enjoyable and at times moving depiction of Hakons story.

View all my reviews

Becky Bookworm Book Review: The Norse Myths - a Guide to Viking and Scandinavian Gods and Heroes by Professor Carolyne Larrington

The Norse Myths: A Guide to Viking and Scandinavian Gods and HeroesThe Norse Myths: A Guide to Viking and Scandinavian Gods and Heroes by Carolyne Larrington

My rating: 5 of 5 stars

An absolute gold mind of infortmation, history and legend lore!
Thoroughly loved reading it. I learnt a lot from it and I was pleased to see how Carolyn also nodded to the various modern forms and features of norse myths in new fiction and tv series...
Highly recommend for anyone who wants to know more about the norse gods and heroes and heroines and trolls and giants and dragons and cursed gold/weapons... there is so much to learn about than Marvel inaccurately portrays.

View all my reviews

Related Posts - LinkWithin

Related Posts with Thumbnails